04 February 2015

Bare-Bones Example of Using WebLogic and Arquillian

The Arquillian project is proving to be very popular for testing code and applications.  It's particularly useful for Java EE projects since it allows for in-container testing to be performed, enabling unit tests to use dependency injection and all the common services  provided by the Java EE platform.

Arquillian uses the concept of container adapters to allow it to execute test code with a  specific test environment.  For the Java EE area,  most of the Java EE implementations have an adapter than can be used to perform the deployment of the archive under test and to execute and report on the results of the unit tests.
A handy way to see all the WebLogic Server related content on the Arquillian blog is this URL: http://arquillian.org/blog/tags/wls/
For WebLogic Server the current set of adapters are listed here: http://arquillian.org/blog/2015/01/09/arquillian-container-wls-1-0-0-Alpha3/

There are multiple adapters available for use.  Some of them are historical and some are for use with older versions of WebLogic Server (10.3).
We are actively working with the Arquillian team on finalizing the name, version and status of a WebLogic Server adapter.
The preferred adapter set from the WebLogic Server perspective are these:

These adapters utilize the WebLogic Server JMX API to perform their tasks and are the adapters used internally by the development teams when working with Arquillian.  They have been tested to work with WebLogic Server [12.1.1, 12.1.2, 12.1.3].  We also have been using them internally with the 12.2.1 version under development to run the CDI TCK and other tests.

To demonstrate WebLogic Server working with Arquillian a bare-bones example is available on GitHub here: https://github.com/buttso/weblogic-with-arquillian

This example has the most basic configuration you can use to employ Arquillian with a Maven project to deploy and execute tests using WebLogic Server 12.1.3.
The README.md file in the project contains more details and a longer description.  In summary though:

1. The first step is to add the Arquillian related dependencies in the Maven pom.xml:

2. The next step is to create an arquillian.xml file that the container adapter uses to connect to the remote server that is being used as the server to run the tests:

3. The last step is to create a unit test which is run with Arquillian.  The unit test is responsible for implementing the @Deployment method which constructs an archive to deploy that contains the code to be tested.  The unit test then provides @Test methods in which the deployment is tested to verify its behaviour:

Executing the unit tests, with the associated archive creation and deployment to the server is performed using the maven test goal:

The tests can be executed directly from IDEs such as NetBeans and Eclipse using the Run Test features:

Executing Tests using NetBeans

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